Featured

Magic Mountain

On a clear day, find your way above the tree canopy in Sacramento, look southwest, and there you’ll spot it—the soaring 3,849-foot peak at the center of Mount Diablo State Park. The summit—reachable by foot, bike or car—rises over a thousand feet higher than the world’s tallest building, and from it, you can see 40 of our state’s 58 counties. At Mount Diablo, you can also hike up to 150 miles of trails, camp in the ultimate “room” with a view, and literally lunch above the clouds. So go west, young men and women, and experience California from a whole new point of view.

The Long Way Home

Earlier this year, Land Park journalist Martin Kuz spent five weeks in Ukraine, both as a reporter covering Russia’s invasion of his late father’s homeland and as a son hoping to better understand the forces that shaped his father’s life. He returned to Sacramento—home to the largest concentration of Ukrainian immigrants in the United States—with a profound new understanding of his complex heritage forged by war and loss. In this essay, Kuz chronicles his journey at the intersection of global history and personal identity.

A Viral Sensation

When Dr. Richard Corsi floated an idea on Twitter for a highly effective, inexpensive, DIY air purifier to help lower the risk of Covid, his light-bulb moment went viral in the best possible way. Now many of America’s top scientists—and even the White House—are touting the invention, and people all over the planet are thinking inside the box.

Send in the Cones

Months into a global pandemic, cities around the world are racing to reimagine their streets so that more of us can walk, bike, exercise and commute more safely. Unfortunately, when it comes to this critical public health issue, Sacramento finds itself backpedaling once again.

Sacramento Public Library CEO Rivkah Sass

Since taking the helm of the Sacramento Public Library system in 2009, Rivkah Sass—who was named Librarian of the Year by the "Library Journal" in 2006 while serving as the executive director of the Omaha Public Library—has shepherded the 28-branch organization through the past decade with the introduction of services like digital access to more than 200,000 e-books and the ability to check out everything from an electric guitar to a GoPro camera. We spoke to the Manteca native about what’s new at the SPL, ways to keep the library relevant in 2020, and bringing big names—from best-selling author Neil Gaiman to rapper 50 Cent—to town.

A New Breed of Zoo

As the city weighs the pros and cons of a far larger zoo, it’s asking where, when and how much. But the most important question should be, “What do we want to build?” We offer a starting point for a conversation about conservation.

The Fall & Rise of Hobo Johnson

Frank Lopes Jr.—the “Hobo” of Hobo Johnson & the Lovemakers—has had, by all accounts, an eventful first 24 years. He has already been, in a very particular order: a troubled student, a homeless teen, a viral video sensation, scorned by Black Lives Matter, swooned over by fans, signed to Warner Bros. Records, Instagrammed by Snoop Dogg, and predicted to be “huge” by New York magazine. On the eve of his major-label debut and a tour schedule that will see him sharing the bill with many of the biggest acts in the world, the Sacramento poet-rapper is working hard to stay grounded at a time when he’s so clearly taking flight.

Track Stars

In Montreal and the Bay Area, transit agencies are sparking civic dialogue by calling for creative ways to repurpose old railcars into cafes, galleries, residential spaces and more. It’s time for Sacramento to jump on board.

Museum by Design

Charles and Ray Eames are considered two of the most acclaimed designers in American history. Now it’s time for Sacramento to make history by building the first museum dedicated to the pair in Ray’s hometown.

A Current Event

As concerns over climate change increase, cities around the world are preparing for rising water levels. One Dutch artist is helping people visualize the potential impact. Our flood-prone River City should dive right in.

The Big Picture

In the world of performing arts centers, a funny thing happened on the way to profitability: Hollywood movies. Here’s how Sacramento can become a star of stage and screen.

Opposites Attract

The buzzy new Beast & Bounty draws diners on both ends of the food spectrum with a smoking-hot menu that is as veggie friendly as it is meat forward.

A Tale of Two Towers

In recent months, proposals emerged for two of the last opportunity sites on Capitol Mall. Each tells a very different story about civic ambition, smart planning and political prudence, or the lack thereof.

Chef Jeremiah Tower

He’s been called the “father of American cuisine” by Martha Stewart and he’s credited with starting the farm-to-fork movement in the 1970s as a chef at Berkeley’s Chez Panisse, where he gained wide acclaim for his use of regional ingredients, including those from Sacramento. Over 40 years later, it’s a full-crop-circle moment for Jeremiah Tower, as he comes to the capital city in September to oversee the Tower Bridge Dinner, which will cap the monthlong Farm-to-Fork Celebration. The food pioneer steps out of the kitchen to talk about the accidental birth of the modern locavore trend, his longtime friendship with local grocer Darrell Corti, and what it feels like to be back in the culinary spotlight.

Brew and 'Cue

Ten years after conceiving the idea, two longtime beer buddies open Urban Roots Brewing & Smokehouse, where they hope to bring neighbors and strangers together, one glass of saison and tray of brisket at a time.

The Shapes of Water

In cities like Venice and London, rivers and canals are doubling as gallery spaces, displaying art like no walls ever could. Let’s make some waves in the art world, too.

The Upside of Underpasses

There’s a growing global phenomenon in which community parks and other highly desirable public spaces are popping up beneath freeways and railway lines. It’s time for us to take a look under the hood as well.

The Whole Earth Cataloguer

UC Davis professor Harris Lewin is about to launch one of the most audacious scientific ventures in human history—to map the DNA of every living thing on Earth. The 10-year, $5 billion quest could result in a tsunami of medical cures, solutions for global hunger, and the creation of a new “Silicon Valley of agricultural science and biotechnology” right here in our backyard. Oh, and it might save the planet too.